The New Louisville Public Library

A Conceptual Image of the new Louisville Public Library

Frequently Asked Questions- NEW Louisville Public Library

Q.  Why a New Library?

A. Library programming has met with great success.  We had over 17,600 people attend our programs last year. We had more than 120,000 visitors to the Library in 2015.  The current building is not ADA accessible and lacks the ability to support a library in the digital age. We are simply out of good usable space to serve our 10,000 library card holders. 

 

Q. Could more library space be created by expanding the Louisville Elementary Library and opening it up to the community, similar to Plain Local Schools Library?  What about an addition to the Louisville Elementary?

A. Louisville Elementary School was not designed to operate as an independent library.  At the time the Library Board visited both Lake and Plain Local Libraries to see their operations.  However, state law would prohibit the school from building a community library without joint investment from the library. Unfortunately, the library didn’t have the resources/funds in the timeframe the schools needed to move forward with their planning.  We also concluded there would be additional costs to include a public library building that would not result in disruption and danger to our elementary school children and this was more than the school system and the library could afford.

 

QIs the need for more physical space irrelevant with materials going digital?

A.  The primary purpose of more space is to enable even more library programming growth.  The Library serves a range of library card holders from those who love reading bound novels to those downloading books and materials electronically.  The library expects the trend to continue moving toward the digital format and have accounted for this in our planning.   LPL’s mission statement and strategic plan has changed over the years.  LPL is not just a place to provide content, it has become a place of learning and access to new technology.  The library has evolved to meet the needs of our community. 

The library utilizes all of our space including, the Old Post Office which is used for the Friends of the Library Book Sales, Storage space, Movies on the Green and the Historical Society as well as other community events.

 

Q. Why was the community told years ago that they would not ask voters for anything other than an operating levy?

A.  LPL has tried to raise the money for the project from private donors or foundations.  After meeting with community members, foundations and hiring a research firm, it became clear this project could not raise enough money to be funded without taxpayer support. Our new Library cannot be built without the help of our community.

  

QWhy can’t the current building be used? Can you update or redesign the present space?  Would this be more cost effective?

AThe main problem/issue with the current building is the size and location. There is no room to expand. The Library is currently landlocked between a neighborhood and the elementary school. The building will be given to the School District when the new Library is completed. The current library was built in an era of typewriters and mimeograph machines before the internet, photo copiers, computers, 3D printers and more.   The power needs of today’s library were beyond comprehension in the era the library was built. 

 

QWhat did the LPL feasibility study show?

A.  The feasibility report states:  “Fifty-eight percent of study participants indicated a willingness to participate on a fundraising committee to help and/or influence others to support a campaign.” Also there are very large signs around the city and township that were provided by the community in order to show their support for this project.

 

Q. Is the support for a new building prevalent? Enough support to place this issue on the ballot again?

A. Support for the new building is prevalent.  Feedback received after the election was that some voters didn’t feel they had enough information, or they simply wanted to know how much their taxes were going to increase due to the re-evaluation of their property value before voting for the new library building.

 

Q. What is the size of the new Library and where will it be built?

A.  The proposed building is 18,500 square feet, to be located at 504 East Main Street next to the Old Post Office. It will house books, audio visual materials, local historical items, computers, four rooms for library programs plus support areas needed for the library operations. The building will be equipped with Wi Fi and have 20 computers for member use. The program rooms can be combined into one large room that can accommodate 200 people with tables and chairs and over 400 with auditorium style seating. This space would also be available for community use when LPL is not having programs. The parking area will provide space for estimated 132 vehicles.

 

Q. What will be the cost be to the average taxpayer of $100,000 home per year for this permanent improvement levy?

A.  It will cost the average home owner $2.63 per month or $31.50 per year for 30 years.  If the home owner has the Homestead Property Tax Rollback, then the cost would be $1.97 per month or $23.62 per year for 30 years.

 

Q. Will LPL need to add to the operating levy if a new library is built?

A.  The cost of operating the new Library is budgeted to be similar or less than the cost of operating the current building.  The current building does not have the efficiencies that could be put into place in the new building. Potential revenues from building rentals were not included in the new budget so the library will not be dependent upon rental income for operations.

Louisville's 21st Century Library
 21st Century Building
 21st Century Programming
 21st Century Technology
FOR THE FUTURE OF OUR COMMUNITY